Orange County

Do-it-yourself animal slaughterings in Carrboro? Should this be allowed?

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen is scheduled to reconsider the issue of at-home animal slaughtering in the town limits Tuesday night.
The Carrboro Board of Aldermen is scheduled to reconsider the issue of at-home animal slaughtering in the town limits Tuesday night. The News & Observer

A descendant of the Southeast Asian red jungle fowl, the chicken first became domesticated in India around 2000 B.C., says the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The chickens born, raised to ripeness and eaten in modern America chiefly come from the British Cornish breed or from New England’s White Rock chicken stock.

You can kill a chicken multiple ways. Necks may be wrung. But decapitation is the commonplace, antiquarian method – an age-old adage even exists relating to such beheaded birds.

The Carrboro Board of Alderman is scheduled to reconsider the issue of at-home animal slaughtering in the town limits Tuesday night.

The issue may prove tricky for the Board to tackle, given the culture of left-of-center Carrboro, where backyard poultry and live-in livestock rub shoulders with animal rights.

Culture aside, the board’s vote may come down to concerns over public’s health.

A Feb. 28 Board of Aldermen meeting questioned whether animal slaughter was already allowed inside town borders based on the existing Town Code.

Because the word “slaughter” was not written within the code, Carrboro planning staff believed animal slaughter was permissible.

Police didn’t see the distinction. They told the board the department had been operating on the understanding that animal slaughter was illegal.

Officers’ thoughts were based on Town Code stating no person may intentionally or maliciously treat an animal cruelly such as – “but not limited to” – subjecting a beast to torture, needless mutilation, sadistic beatings or plainly killing a barnyard critter.

To clear the confusion, the board amended the Animal Control Ordinance, adding the word “slaughter” and thereby explicitly allowing in-town slaughterings.

The slaughter issue arose before the Board again on March 21.

A Chapel Hill-Carrboro school district kindergarten teacher, Arwen Carlin, told the board she was opposed to permissible slaughter and asked the aldermen to ban it.

Antwan Foster voiced opposition based on claims of inhumane treatment toward fowl during shipment.

Caylan Otto not only opposed the slaughter provision of the town’s code but also encouraged an incorporation of laws promoting ethical treatment of animals.

Alderman Sammy Slade sought to bring voices from all of Carrboro’s communities into the slaughter dialogues, because, he said different communities would have o different viewpoints of stay-at-home butchery.

The board passed a motion 5-1 in favor of revisiting the issue at a later date.

Now, the debate is set to continue Tuesday evening. The emeeting begins at 7:30 p.m. in Carrboro Town Hall, 301 W Main St.

Colin Warren-Hicks: 919-419-6636, @CWarrenHicks

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