North Carolina

UNC’s NCAA infractions hearing resumes for second day. Here’s who’s there — and who’s not.

North Carolina football coach Larry Fedora, center, arrives at an NCAA hearing on Wednesday. It has taken more than two years for North Carolina to appear before an NCAA infractions committee panel since initially being charged with five top-level violations amid its long-running academic scandal.
North Carolina football coach Larry Fedora, center, arrives at an NCAA hearing on Wednesday. It has taken more than two years for North Carolina to appear before an NCAA infractions committee panel since initially being charged with five top-level violations amid its long-running academic scandal. AP

UNC-Chapel Hill’s hearing with the NCAA Committee on Infractions resumed at 8:30 a.m. local time on Thursday, after the university and the committee met for nearly 10 hours on Wednesday. The hearing is expected to end at some point on Thursday, though it is unclear when.

Roy Williams and Sylvia Hatchell, the UNC men’s and women’s basketball coaches who attended the first day of the proceedings, returned on Thursday. Larry Fedora, the football coach, has returned to North Carolina, as has Debby Crowder, who left after appearing on Wednesday.

The rest of UNC’s representatives – chancellor Carol Folt, athletic director Bubba Cunningham and a team of legal and NCAA compliance representatives – returned for the second day of the hearing, which is the next step in a long-running NCAA investigation.

The investigation began in June 2014. During the past three years, the NCAA has issued three notices of allegations, each one an attempt to build a case against a long-running system of bogus African Studies courses that the NCAA has alleged helped academically at-risk athletes maintain eligibility.

The stakes of the infractions hearing are high. The committee can reject some of the NCAA enforcement staff’s case, or add new charges. The NCAA has alleged that the problems that surrounded the courses violated bylaws concerning impermissible benefits.

UNC is also facing a charge of lack of institutional control. The university has refuted that the classes, and the problems surrounding them, constitute a violation of NCAA bylaws. The university has also rejected the accusation of a lack of institutional control.

After the hearing, the committee could take several months to issue its final ruling, which would include penalties and sanctions. When UNC appeared before the infractions committee in a separate case in 2011, it took 136 days for the committee to issue its ruling.

Andrew Carter: 919-829-8944, @_andrewcarter

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