Letters to the Editor

6 things that would get me to come to downtown Chapel Hill

At right, Jesalyn Keziah leads her pop-up yoga group on the plaza at 140 West Franklin as a passerby walks through on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in downtown Chapel Hill, NC. Keziah was invited to the plaza as part of events being held during the Chapel Hill Farmer’s Market.
At right, Jesalyn Keziah leads her pop-up yoga group on the plaza at 140 West Franklin as a passerby walks through on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in downtown Chapel Hill, NC. Keziah was invited to the plaza as part of events being held during the Chapel Hill Farmer’s Market. tgrubb@newsobserver.com

How to help downtown

Many years ago, I told people which features would attract me to downtown Chapel Hill:

1. Get rid of the parallel parking, except for occasional nose-in handicapped parking. It looks too much like a car place, thereflections are bright and harsh, and the place is too hot.

2. Widen the sidewalks.

3. Install road-shading street trees.

4. Install benches every 100 feet.

5. Install water fountains every 200 feet.

6. Add a major water feature and a play area.

When it is hot, it is hard to find shade, comfort and breeze. Havebusinesses considered putting fans under their awnings?

Sarah McIntee

Chapel Hill

Misleading amendments

Don’t vote for the N.C. constitutional amendments. They should have passed legislation stating exactly the language each amendment would add to our constitution. Reject every one of these misleading amendments.

No blank checks for this unbalanced legislature.

Sherri Zann Rosenthal

Durham

Vote against all 6

On Saturday, I took my father to vote. He is 103. He stopped driving at age 90, so he doesn’t have a driver license. While he is of sound mind, the ability to vote early without a driver license and to use curbside voting was critical in allowing him to exercise his civic responsibility, which he takes very seriously.

Dad grew up on a farm in Kentucky and ultimately went on to get a Ph.D. in economics on the G.I. bill. He cares deeply that others have the same opportunity for a good education.We need more state representatives who will protect our right to vote and support our school system. Unlike the legislators who forced the misleading and damaging constitutional amendments onto our ballot, Rep. Graig Meyer took the time to meet with his constituents and explain exactly what each amendment means.

I’m hoping all North Carolina voters will carefully consider these amendments and, like my Dad, will vote early, vote for legislators who truly care about the welfare of all North Carolina residents, and vote against all six amendments.

Alice Ammerman

Chapel Hill

Making a buck

For those who’ve missed it, I’d like to mention a really lousy idea that has been in the news lately. Erik Prince (remember Blackwater?) wants to privatize the war in Afghanistan. Like his sister, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Prince pushes the profit motive as a cure for some of our country’s most complicated ills. Let’s see, is there anyone else in Washington whose value system revolves around making a buck?

Beth J. Berman

Durham

Money before integrity

President Trump has already shown a proclivity toward despots such as Putin and the Saudi hierarchy in matters of extreme situations involving hacking, election disruption, assassinations and murder.

He, his son and his secretary of state have already laid the groundwork for minimizing the level of Saudi involvement in the murder of the Turkish journalist so he can avoid making a major decision as to a response to their guilt.

Like he always has during his entire life and as president, money is more important than integrity and justice. What’s worse, his base believes, as do the Republican congressmen, that whatever he says is sacrosanct despite the overwhelming evidence that he lies constantly.

David Pesapane

Durham

Tyranny of the minority

In the recent Senate vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh, the two senators from California who voted “no” represented over 37 million Americans, but their votes were canceled out by the two senators from Wyoming who represented less than 600,000 Americans and voted “yes.” Similarly, the two senators from New York who voted “no” on behalf of approximately 20 million people were offset by the two senators from South Dakota voting “yes” on behalf of 800,000 people.

The framers of the Constitution obviously wanted it this way in the Senate, in order to limit the influence of the big states, but how does this square, in a bitterly contested matter, with our notion that the vote of any U.S. citizen should be as important as that of any other U.S. citizen?

Along the same line, we are now saddled with a president who holds office despite receiving fewer votes than his opponent.

Robert A. Bogle

Fearrington Village

Election letters

Letters endorsing candidates must be received at letters@heraldun.com by Friday Oct. 26 , to be considered for publication before the Nov. 6 election.



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