State

Rains gone but flooding threatens eastern N.C.

Nautica Jackson, left, and Aniya Ruffin walk through floodwaters with their dog as water threatened to enter their home in Raleigh on Tuesday.
Nautica Jackson, left, and Aniya Ruffin walk through floodwaters with their dog as water threatened to enter their home in Raleigh on Tuesday. The News and Observer

The rains have gone but flooding still poses a problem in much of eastern North Carolina.

The National Weather Service reports that flooding is possible along several major rivers in the state through the end of the week.

A flood warning remained in effect in central North Carolina, including Raleigh, Durham, Cary, Rocky Mount, Goldsboro, Tarboro and Smithfield until midday Wednesday.

Flooding was also occurring or expected along the Cape Fear River in Fayetteville, the Tar River near Tarboro and Greenville and the Lumber River at Lumberton.

The problems were not expected to reach the same levels as the flooding from Hurricane Matthew last fall.

Several school districts started classes two hours later than usual Wednesday.

In Brunswick County on Tuesday, a high school bus driver has been fired after district officials allege she ignored barricades and drove through standing water.

Brunswick County Schools spokeswoman Jessica Swencki said the driver was fired hours after it happened Tuesday. She said Marsha McMillian ignored barricades on the road that’s part of her route. All students on her bus made it to school safely.

A witness recorded video of the bus driving through the pooled water that was splashing around its tires. The American Red Cross said in a news release Wednesday that it was opening a shelter at St. Stephen Missionary Baptist Church in Tarboro.

The Red Cross says those who need help can come to the church for food, a safe place to stay, and to work one-on-one with Red Cross caseworkers.

The Red Cross is also monitoring rivers in Pitt County as water levels are expected to rise.

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