Education

School mural in Chapel Hill reflects students’ home, culture

Students paint a mural as part of “Dibujando Nuestro Pueblo” (“Drawing Our Village”) a yearlong project at Frank Porter Graham Bilingüe elementary school in Chapel Hill. The project focused on ideas related to culture, home, identity, and unity and culminated in the mural in the school courtyard unveiled June 1. The project came together through a partnership between assistant principal José Nambo, school counselor Barbie Garayúa-Tudryn and two local artists, Mary Carter Taub and Amy Keenan Amago, who are also parents of students at the school. The project was funded by the school PTA, the Orange County Arts Commission and the Grassroots Program of the N.C. Arts Council.
Students paint a mural as part of “Dibujando Nuestro Pueblo” (“Drawing Our Village”) a yearlong project at Frank Porter Graham Bilingüe elementary school in Chapel Hill. The project focused on ideas related to culture, home, identity, and unity and culminated in the mural in the school courtyard unveiled June 1. The project came together through a partnership between assistant principal José Nambo, school counselor Barbie Garayúa-Tudryn and two local artists, Mary Carter Taub and Amy Keenan Amago, who are also parents of students at the school. The project was funded by the school PTA, the Orange County Arts Commission and the Grassroots Program of the N.C. Arts Council. courtesy of Amy Keenan Amago

Dibujando Nuestro Pueblo (Drawing Our Village) is a collaborative, school-based art project that took place at Frank Porter Graham Bilingüe throughout the 2016-2017 school year.

The project - which focuses on ideas related to culture, home, identity, and unity - culminated in a permanent, student/family-generated mural in FPGB’s courtyard. The project was completed through a partnership between the school’s assistant principal, José Nambo, the school counselor, Barbie Garayúa-Tudryn , and two local artists, Mary Carter Taub and Amy Keenan Amago, who are also parents of students at FPBG. The project was funded with generous support from the FPGB PTA, the Orange County Arts Commission, and the Grassroots Program of the NC Arts Council.

There were two phases of the Dibujando Nuestro Pueblo project. The fall portion consisted of a series of four interactive sessions in which FPG families (half Spanish speaking, half English speaking) participated by sharing their origin stories, discussing what their cultures and identities meant to them, and then making art related to those ideas. The artwork created during the fall sessions was displayed in the school’s lobby; it also informed sketches and ideas for the mural design.

Throughout the spring, Taub and Amago collaborated with students, families, and faculty members to create the Dibujando Nuestro Pueblo mural. The mural illustrates the ideas, experiences, and symbols of the school community’s interwoven and varied cultural histories as well as FPGB’s focus on unity and cross-cultural understanding.

  Comments