Orange County

Silent Sam protesters appear in court. One had been acquitted in Durham statue case.

First appearances for two arrested during Saturday’s ‘Silent Sam’ protest

Kristin Emery, 26, and Thomas Bruefach, 18, made their first appearances on Monday, Aug. 27, for charges both of misdemeanor resisting a public officer and Bruefach for also causing a public disturbance during Saturday's 'Silent Sam' protest.
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Kristin Emery, 26, and Thomas Bruefach, 18, made their first appearances on Monday, Aug. 27, for charges both of misdemeanor resisting a public officer and Bruefach for also causing a public disturbance during Saturday's 'Silent Sam' protest.

Four people charged in last week’s Silent Sam protests on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus appeared briefly before judges Monday in Orange County District Court.

They are among 11 people arrested since Aug. 20 when the Confederate statue was toppled.

One of those charged, Raul Arce Jimenez, was also among those charged with toppling a Confederate statue in Durham a year ago.

In that case, a District Court judge found Jimenez not guilty of injury to real property, defacing a public building or monument, and conspiracy to deface a public building or monument. He had been accused of holding a ladder and manipulating a strap used to bring down the statue.

The four people who appeared in Orange County court Monday were represented by attorneys at their hearings and given new court dates.

Lillian Laura Price, 20, of Chapel Hill, who was charged Aug. 20 with misdemeanor injury to personal property. She was released on a written promise to appear. Her next court hearing will be Jan. 22.

Thomas Bruefach, 18, of Charlotte, who was charged Saturday with two misdemeanors: resisting a public officer and causing a public disturbance. He was released under a $1,000 secured bond. His next court date will be Sept. 20.

John Quick, 35, of Carrboro, who was charged Saturday with misdemeanor simple assault. He was released on a written promise to appear. His next court date will be Sept. 20.

Kristin Emery, 26, of Durham, who was charged Saturday with misdemeanor resisting a public officer. She was released on a $1,000 secured bond. Her next court date will be Oct. 9.

Emery also is facing a misdemeanor charge of impeding traffic by sitting, standing or lying in the roadway in Wake County. Her hearing in that case is scheduled for Sept. 27.

Protesters toppled Silent Sam, the Confederate statue on UNC-Chapel Hill's campus, on Monday after a demonstration in support of a graduate student who faces criminal and honor court charges for throwing red ink and blood on the statue in April.

Three more people who were arrested at Saturday’s protest will be in court on Thursday. The remaining four people, who were charged in connection with the Aug. 20 protest and vandalism, already have court dates scheduled this fall.

The others charged are:

Lauren Aucoin, 23, of Hillsborough, was charged Aug. 20 with two misdemeanors: causing a public disturbance and defacing, writing on, marking or injuring a public statue or monument. Aucoin was released on a $2,000 unsecured bond and is scheduled to return to court Sept. 6

Jonathan Fuller, 27, of Durham, was charged Aug. 20 with two misdemeanors: causing a public disturbance and defacing, writing on, marking or injuring a public statue or monument. He was released on a $5,000 unsecured bond and is scheduled to return to court Sept. 4.

Jimenez, 27, of Raleigh, was charged Aug. 20 with two misdemeanors: causing a public disturbance and defacing, writing on, marking or injuring a public statue or monument. He was released on a $2,000 unsecured bond and is scheduled to return to court Aug. 30.

Ian Broadhead, 28, of Vilas, N.C., was charged Aug. 20 with two misdemeanors: resisting a public officer and concealing his face during a public rally. He is scheduled to return to court Oct. 9.

Dannielle Shochet, 47, of Raleigh was charged Saturday with simple assault. He was released on a written promise to appear and is scheduled to return to court on Aug. 30.

Barry Brown, 40, of Liberty, was charged Saturday with simple affray. Brown was released on a written promise to appear and is scheduled to return to court Aug. 30.

Alexander Joustra, 30,of Carrboro was charged Aug. 20 with misdemeanor injury to real property. He was released on a written promise to appear and is scheduled to return to court Sept. 6. Joustra has a previous conviction for injury real property in 2012.

Protesters clashed at UNC-Chapel Hill five days after the toppling of the Silent Sam Confederate statue. Police arrested seven people by early afternoon on Saturday, August 25, 2018.



Both protests drew hundreds of Silent Sam protesters and a much smaller crowd of statue supporters to the campus. Saturday’s protest was sparked by rumors of a possible rally involving Confederate and white supremacist groups at the 105-year-old Silent Sam statue. Four people were charged in connection with that event.

Several scuffles broke out between the groups on Saturday, and dozens of protesters rushed police making arrests, pinning them at one time against the outside of Graham Hall, where those arrested were being held.

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UNC Chancellor Carol Folt said Saturday she will not be rushed into making a decision about the statue’s future. University administrators are working with the Board of Governors and others to find a safe, sustainable solution, she said.

“We all have to recognize that the Confederate monument is a flashpoint for demonstrations and disruptions, and we believe it will continue to be a lightning rod,” she said Saturday in a news conference.

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UNC and state leaders have criticized the toppling of the statue, which is protected, along with other monuments on public property, by a 2015 state law. While the law requires that statues and monuments moved temporarily be reinstalled within 90 days, it also allows for statues and monuments that are in peril to be removed.

Silent Sam has stood on UNC-Chapel Hill's McCorkle Place for 105 years. On Monday August 20, 2018, it was brought down by protesters.

Tammy Grubb: 919-829-8926; @TammyGrubb
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