Durham County

Bike lanes coming to 10 Durham streets, and a new path, too. See where

Sacramento mayor tests ‘protected’ bike lane

An effort to create protected bike lanes like this one in Sacramento, California, will have to wait in Durham.
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An effort to create protected bike lanes like this one in Sacramento, California, will have to wait in Durham.

If you drive one of the 11,000 cars that take Cornwallis Road between South Roxboro and Fayetteville streets every day, get ready to share the road.

About a half-mile of it could get buffered bike lanes, a pedestrian crossing and areas for buses to pull off.

And Cornwallis Road isn’t the only street that is being redesigned to make it safer for people on foot and bikes to use the roads, too.

In the city, Durham is planning for new bike lanes on parts of 10 roads.

The county, meanwhile, is pushing the N.C. Department of Transportation to add a multi-use path for pedestrians and bicyclists between U.S. 70 and the Durham-Wake county line.

It’s years from being funded, but Reckhow says it’s important to look at multi-use paths on major roads where drivers are going at higher speeds.

“Those are the roads that benefit tremendously by having off-road paths to make bicyclists safer,” she said. She’d like to see the same for the future of N.C. 54, too.

Commissioners Chair Wendy Jacobs said corridors should be about moving people, not just cars. “People are already biking on 98,” she said. “We want it to be safe for families, for children.”

New bike lanes in the city

The city has proposed designs for sections of 10 roads and is asking the public what it thinks about them.

American Drive: In the American Village neighborhood between Constitution Drive and Morreene Road, American Drive would be redesigned to include bike lanes and sidewalks. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3680/American-Drive

Chapel Hill Road: Between Lakewood Avenue and Pickett Road. On Chapel Hill Road, parking and lanes shared by cars and bikes would be converted to car lanes and bike lanes separated by buffers. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3721/Chapel-Hill-Road

Cornwallis Road: Between South Roxboro and Fayetteville streets. The proposal calls for buffered bike lanes, a pedestrian crossing and places for buses to pull out of traffic are planned. Instead of four 12-foot-wide car lanes plus a center turning lane, the proposed road would have two 12-foot wide car lanes, a center turning lane, and two 6-foot-wide bike lanes with 6-foot-wide buffers between bike and car lanes. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3686/Cornwallis-Road

ChapelHillRoad.JPG
A proposed change to Chapel Hill Road in Durham that would create buffered bike lanes. City of Durham

Lakewood Avenue: Bike lanes will be added between Fayetteville and North Duke streets, both next to car lanes and in lanes shared with cars. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3682/Lakewood-Ave

Liberty Street: Between Dillard Street and North Miami Boulevard. Driving lanes will be narrowed and bike lanes will be added with road striping. Lanes that are now 14.5 feet wide and 16 feet wide will be narrowed to 10 feet for a 4.5-foot-wide bike lane or 11 feet for a 5-foot-wide bike lane, respectively. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3637/Liberty-Street

Meriwether Drive: Carver Street to Old Oxford Road. Car lanes that are 17 feet wide will be narrowed to 10 feet with a 2-foot-wide buffer and 5-foot wide bike lanes. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3689/Meriwether-Drive

North Miami Boulevard: Between Geer and Raynor streets. That stretch of Miami Boulevard ranges from two to four lanes with some parallel parking. The Village Shopping Center is on it. Bike lanes will be added, some with striping and some with buffers. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3687/North-Miami-Boulevard

Raynor Street: Between Liberty Street and North Miami Boulevard. On Raynor Street, the sections from Liberty Street to Holloway Street and Holloway Street to North Miami Boulevard are all car lanes. Shared bike and car lanes along with parallel parking on one side would be added to Liberty Street to Holloway Street portion of Raynor Street. From Holloway Street to North Miami Boulevard, Raynor Street will have striped bike lanes next to the car lanes, which will remain 11 feet wide but be two lanes with a center turning lane rather than four lanes across. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3717/Raynor-Street

Stadium Drive/Olympic Avenue: Stadium Drive and Olympic Avenue are the access roads for the Durham County Stadium and Duke Regional Hospital. Also nearby are Whippoorwill Park, Warren Creek Trail, Ellerbee Creek Trail and Rock Quarry Park. Sections of the proposed changes are on Stadium Drive between Horton Road and North Duke Street and Stadium Drive/Olympic Avenue between North Duke Street and Roxboro Street. Car lanes would be narrowed from 11 feet wide and 20 feet wide to 11 feet wide, with buffered bike lanes on the sides. Details and survey: durhamnc.gov/3683/Stadium-Drive-and-Olympic-Avenue

The bike lanes network was recommended by residents and funding for the designs will come from the city’s Capital Improvement Program. If approved, the lanes would be funded by federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds and local funds, according to Bryan Poole, the city’s bicycle and pedestrian transportation planner.

Durham City Council adopted the Bike+Walk Plan in 2017: durhamnc.gov/3092/BikeWalk-Plan-2017.

Dawn Baumgartner Vaughan: 919-419-6563, @dawnbvaughan
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