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Election Day in Durham: What you need to know

Five things you need to know to vote in November

The 2018 mid-term election will include federal, state and local offices, along with six amendments the legislature wants on the ballot. Here's what you need to know to vote.
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The 2018 mid-term election will include federal, state and local offices, along with six amendments the legislature wants on the ballot. Here's what you need to know to vote.

Thousands of Durham voters cast their ballots during early voting, but Election Day is the big event. Here’s what you need to know to vote in Durham County on Tuesday, Nov. 6.

Polls open at 6:30 a.m. and continue until 7:30 p.m. If you are in line at 7:30 p.m., you will be allowed to vote.

You can catch a free ride to the polls on a GoDurham bus from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. For the second year, the city of Durham is funding free bus fare on Election Day. The city started fare free Election Day in 2017 after a request from the Durham Committee on the Affairs of Black People. The cost to the city is $6,300. Visit GoDurham to look up bus routes.

The early voting total for Durham County was 81,195 ballots cast, with the highest early voting turnout on Nov. 2, with 7,776 ballots cast. The South Regional Library early voting site had the biggest turnout overall, with 24,131 ballots cast at that location. On Election Day, voters must cast their ballots at their designated polling place.

Look up your polling place: dcovotes.com/voters/voting/polling-locations

Ballots will be different depending on your legislative and Congressional districts. Look up your voter information at https://vt.ncsbe.gov/RegLkup/.

The winners of the Democratic primaries for Durham County district attorney and sheriff in May are unopposed on the ballot. Satana Deberry defeated incumbent District Attorney Roger Echols, and Clarence Birkhead defeated incumbent Sheriff Mike Andrews. Although neither has an opponent on the ballot, Birkhead has two announced write-in challengers: George Boykin and sheriff’s Maj. Paul Martin.

Here’s the list of candidates on Durham ballots:

Durham County races

District Attorney:

Satana Deberry, Democrat

Clerk of Superior Court:

Archie Smith, Democrat

Sheriff:

Clarence Birkhead, Democrat

Note: George Boykin and sheriff’s Maj. Paul Martin are announced write-in candidates for sheriff.

Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor:

David Harris

Natalie Murdock

Jason Watson

Laura Marie Davis

Judges

N.C. Supreme Court Associate Justice Seat 1 (Jackson seat):

Barbara Jackson, Republican

Christopher (Chris) Anglin, Republican

Anita Earls, Democrat

N.C. Court of Appeals Judge Seat 1 (Arrowood seat):

Andrew T. Heath, Republican

John S. Arrowood, Democrat

N.C. Court of Appeals Judge Seat 2 (Calabria seat):

Jefferson G. Griffin, Republican

Tobias (Toby) Hampson, Democrat

Sandra Alice Ray, Republican

N.C. Court of Appeals Judge Seat 3 (Elmore seat):

Chuck Kitchen, Republican

Michael Monaco Sr., Libertarian

Allegra Katherine Collins, Democrat

N.C. Superior Court Judge District 14B Seat 1 (Hardin seat):

James E. (Jim) Hardin Jr., Democrat

N.C. Superior Court Judge District 14B Seat 2 (O’Foghludha seat):

Michael O’Foghludha, Democrat

N.C. Superior Court Judge District 14B Seat 3 (O’Neal seat):

Josephine Kerr Davis, Democrat

Dawn Baxton, Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 1 (Battaglia seat):

Dave Hall, Democrat

Fred Battaglia Jr., Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 2 (Walker seat):

Doretta L. Walker, Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 3 (Evans seat):

Pat Evans, Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 4 (Wilks seat):

Brian C. Wilks, Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 5 (Hill seat):

James T. (Jim) Hill, Republican

Clayton Jones, Democrat

N.C. District Court Judge District 14 Seat 6 (Maris seat):

Amanda Maris, Democrat

North Carolina races

N.C. Senate District 20:

Floyd B. McKissick Jr., Democrat

Tom Stark, Republican

Jared Erickson, Libertarian

N.C. Senate District 22:

Rickey (Rick) Padgett, Republican

Ray Ubinger, Libertarian

Mike Woodard, Democrat

N.C. House of Representatives District 29:

Charles Becker, Republican

MaryAnn E. Black, Democrat

N.C. House of Representatives District 30:

Marcia Morey, Democrat

Matthew Wagoner, Libertarian

B. Angelo Burch Sr., Republican

N.C. House of Representatives District 31:

Zack Forde-Hawkins, Democrat

Erik Raudsep, Libertarian

Torian Webson, Republican

N.C. House of Representatives District 54:

Robert T. Reives II, Democrat

Jay Stobbs, Republican

Federal races

U.S. House of Representatives District 1:

Roger W. Allison, Republican

G.K. Butterfield, Democrat

U.S. House of Representatives District 4:

Barbara Howe, Libertarian

Steve A. Von Loor, Republican

David Price, Democrat

N.C. Constitutional Amendments

Voters will vote for or against six amendments to the state constitution.

The NC legislature is placing six constitutional amendments on the fall ballot. Here's a look at what North Carolinians will be voting on.

“Constitutional amendment protecting the right of the people to hunt, fish and harvest wildlife.”

“Constitutional amendment to strengthen protections for victims of crime; to establish certain absolute basic rights for victims; and to ensure the enforcement of these rights.”

“Constitutional amendment to reduce the income tax rate in North Carolina to a maximum allowable rate of seven percent (7%).”

“Constitutional amendment to require voters to provide photo identification before voting in person.”

“Constitutional amendment to change the process for filling judicial vacancies that occur between judicial elections from a process in which the Governor has sole appointment power to a process in which the people of the State nominate individuals to fill vacancies by way of a commission comprised of appointees made by the judicial, executive, and legislative branches charged with making recommendations to the legislature as to which nominees are deemed qualified; then the legislature will recommend at least two nominees to the Governor via legislative action not subject to gubernatorial veto; and the Governor will appoint judges from among these nominees.”

“Constitutional amendment to establish an eight-member Bipartisan Board of Ethics and Elections Enforcement in the Constitution to administer ethics and elections law.”

Dawn Baumgartner Vaughan: 919-419-6563, @dawnbvaughan

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