Faith

Labyrinth returns to Binkley Baptist for Holy Week reflection

Stepheny Houghtlin walks the labyrinth in the sanctuary of The Olin T. Binkley Memorial Baptist Church in this file photo. “It’s a very special experience,” Houghtlin said of her walk. “It’s an opportunity to have a different experience of prayer.” The labyrinth, sponsored by a number of churches in the Chapel Hill area, is set up during Holy Week.
Stepheny Houghtlin walks the labyrinth in the sanctuary of The Olin T. Binkley Memorial Baptist Church in this file photo. “It’s a very special experience,” Houghtlin said of her walk. “It’s an opportunity to have a different experience of prayer.” The labyrinth, sponsored by a number of churches in the Chapel Hill area, is set up during Holy Week. ehyman@newsobserver.com

The Holy Week Labyrinth at Olin T. Binkley Memorial Baptist Church, 1712 Willow Drive, Chapel Hill, is an annual ecumenical offering open through Friday.

Doors open at 6:30 a.m. and close Wednesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. The labrynth will close at 1:30 p.m. Good Friday with a service at noon.

Participating congregations are Chapel of the Cross Episcopal, Church of Reconciliation Presbyterian, Holy Trinity Lutheran, St. Thomas More Catholic, United Church of Chapel Hill.

The labyrinth, a hand-crafted replica of the 11-circuit one at the Cathedral at Chartes, France, is laid on the sanctuary floor at Binkley Church.

The labyrinth was originally designed in the medieval church as a way for persons to make a pilgrimage of the heart, if they could not make the pilgrimage to Jerusalem. It was renewed as a spiritual practice in the 1990s and now there are labyrinths available for prayer walks globally.

‘Way of the Cross’

Immaculata Catholic School in Durham will give its annual “Way of the Cross,” a Lenten performance and worship experience about the passion and resurrection of Jesus at 1:30 p.m. today, April 12, at the church, 810 W. Chapel Hill St.

This living Stations of the Cross with meditations is a decades-old tradition presented by middle school students.

Services

Two services on Friday, April 14, will mark Good Friday in downtown Durham.

The first at noon including Stations of the Cross is one First Presbyterian and St. Philip’s Episcopal churches have collaborated on for years. It is a family-friendly spiritual pilgrimage and a meditation of the Passion Week texts in Durham’s downtown context.

The service will begin at St. Philip’s and end at First Presbyterian.

The second at 7 p.m. in the sanctuary at First Presbyterian is a Tenebrae service that makes use of gradually diminishing light that symbolizes the approaching darkness of Jesus’ death and of hopelessness in the world without God.

First Presbyterian will hold three Easter services on Sunday. The first in the Memorial Garden at 8:30 a.m. and the second and third with Holy Communion in the sanctuary at 9 and 11 a.m.

Here are some other local services:

▪ The Easter sunrise service at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 4701 N.C. 86, Chapel Hill, begins at 7:30 a.m. The Chancel Choir will present “Hear the News This Easter Morn,” accompanied by handbells and trumpets at both the sunrise and 11 a.m. services.

Breakfast will be served at 8:30 a.m.

▪ Joe Moran, retired Southeast director of Church World Service and of Durham’s CROP Hunger Walk, will speak at the Easter Sunday worship service at 10 a.m. at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 2620 Weaver, St., Durham.

▪ Durham Ministers in Prayer, a multi-cultural, multi-denominational group praying together for Durham for more than 18 years will hold a Maundy Thursday Communion Service from 7 to 8 :30 p.m. on Thursday, April 13, hosted by Mosaic Church, 2031 W. Club Blvd. Contact Pastor Dan Johnson at 919-815-3111 or Pastor Michael Britt at919-584-1101 for details.

▪ The Easter Sunrise Service in the Sarah P. Duke Gardens will begin at 6:30 a.m. Sunday, April 16, on the south lawn of the gardens. Gates will open at 6 o’clock. Bring a flashlight to help navigate the darkened path from the parking lot through the gardens. There are chairs for the service, but those who attend might want to bring a towel to wipe off the early-morning dew.

▪ Holy Week events at St. Benedict Anglican Catholic Church, 870 Weaver Dairy Road, Chapel Hill, will include the 7 p.m. Maundy Thursday service April 13 with Holy Communion and the Stripping of the Altar. This service begins joyfully and celebrates the Institution by Christ of the Holy Communion. The service then enters into the sorrows that will lead to Christ’s agony in the garden, and on the cross on Friday. The next day, on Good Friday, the altar is bare. The bells do not ring again until Sundaywhen followers of Jesus enter into the joy of Christ’s triumph over death. On Good Friday there is prayer at noon and a 6 p.m. devotion on the Seven Last Words of Christ. The Easter Eve Vigil on Holy Saturday is at 5 p.m. and the Easter Sunday service of Morning Prayer and Holy Communion begins at 10 a.m.

Family seder

A non-theistic traditional family seder is being offered by Kol Haskalah, a Humanistic Judaism Congregation, from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, April 16. Participants should bring a Passover dish of eight portions to the fellowship hall at Eno River Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 4907 Garrett Road, Durham.

The celebration will center on “Let My People Go” for an end to slavery, trafficking and for compassionate immigration reform within the Seder order.

Christian women

Women of all ages are invited to the Durham Christian Women’s Connection luncheon at 9:45 a.m. on Saturday, April 15, in the Commons Dining Room at Croasdaile Village, 2600 Croasdaile Farm Parkway, Durham.

A special feature will be a presented by Becky Clayton on “Herbs of the Bible” and Ginny Karellus will speak on “Embracing the Impossible,” after living in atheism for 32 years.

A hot buffet luncheon for $10 will be served.

Farm workers

The annual gathering of agencies, organizations and activists dedicated to improving the lives of farm workers and their families will meet from 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Church of the Reconciliation, 110 N. Elliott Road, Chapel Hill, on Thursday, April 20.

Participants will share skills, knowledge and resources through workshops and networking. Farm worker advocates from across the state will have a chance to learn and update themselves on the latest issues affecting North Carolina farm workers.

Contact Flo Johnston at fjohnston314@gmail.com or call 910-361-4135.

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