Letters to the Editor

6/30 Letters: 2020 Dems spoke too much Spanish and pandered for votes

From left, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and former Maryland Rep. John Delaney pose for a photo on stage before the start of a Democratic primary debate hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Miami.
From left, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and former Maryland Rep. John Delaney pose for a photo on stage before the start of a Democratic primary debate hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Wednesday, June 26, 2019, in Miami. online@thestate.com

Dems want too much free stuff

After watching Wednesday’s Democratic debate I would like to know who could vote for any of these candidates?

They were speaking in Spanish, knowing this is America and we don’t all speak Spanish. They were pandering to illegal voters.

These candidates want free education, free healthcare, etc. I worked all my life and am retired; I don’t want to pay for a bunch of freeloaders on my dime.

Buddy Holeman, Wake Forest

Trump is not worthy of respect

Regarding “Offensive cartoon,” (June 27 Forum);

A recent letter criticized an editorial cartoon stating it was “disgusting.” The writer expressed concern that the depiction of the president offending the Statue of Liberty presented a terrible example for young people.

I agree, it is important for young Americans to have a role model worthy of respect; however, lying misogynists fail to meet that criteria.

Ken Gorman, Durham

Soccer’s Rapinoe shows disrespect

I have two granddaughters playing competitive soccer. I had looked forward to watching the Women’s World Cup.

I still may watch some matches, but I will not be watching the U.S. team. I am disgusted with the behavior of the team co-captain, Megan Rapinoe.

She is willing to represent our country on the world stage, but unwilling to honor it. She may be a great soccer player, but she severely lacks personal integrity.

Bob Jensen, Holly Springs

Holding out hope for bipartisanship

The fact that U.S. foreign aid is so unilaterally supported signals the considerable benefits it produces.

For the fiscally conservative Republican, aid is the key to unlocking the largest untapped consumer base in the world: developing countries.

For the socially liberal Democrat, foreign aid has the obvious humanitarian benefit of uplifting the world’s poor; the left is conscientious of the fact that the number of people suffering from hunger is greater than the population of the US, Canada and EU combined.

The patriotic baby-boomer knows that foreign aid translates to American leadership on the global stage, and stabilizes regions at risk for harboring anti-American terrorists and other national security threats.

The cosmopolitan millennial recognizes that aid is essential in creating their interconnected international community; foreign aid makes it possible to exchange ideas, culture and products.

It may seem impossible that one issue can cross the partisan boundary, or encourage our representatives to shake hands with competitors across the aisle. But when Democrat Tim Kaine can co-sponsor a foreign aid bill with Republican Marco Rubio, anything seems possible.

Foreign aid sustains the hope for bipartisanship in our polarized political age.

Maris Thomson, Chapel Hill

Zane needs to look in the mirror

J. Peder Zane started his June 25 column writing about a lively gay pride parade in Hendersonville that served as “yet another sign of how North Carolina, and America, continues to become more inclusive and welcoming.”

I found myself nodding in agreement, happy to read that this country is far more tolerant than many liberals believe.

But alas, Zane couldn’t stop there. True to type, he swerved from that compassionate, mediating tone and returned to his familiar vitriol.

Liberals, he claimed, are “using their power and privilege to impose their views on the rest of us” in order to “smear” America.

Zane, please look in the mirror. If there is a hateful group of people smearing and dividing the US, you are most certainly part of it.

Amanda Abrams, Durham

Berger is wrong about Medicaid

Sen. Phil Berger’s column (June 23) was very thought provoking.

It made me think, “Why does one man from Rockingham County get to decide such an essential issue for 10 million North Carolinians?”

We have 400,000 people in this state, most of them working and 12,000 of them veterans, who have no option for health insurance.

They don’t qualify for Medicaid and make too little to get help on the health insurance exchange. This is crazy!

We have it in our power to create a solution for them that they can afford. Why aren’t we doing it?

I have never met Sen. Berger from Rockingham County, but he says he cares about working people. He sure has a strange way of showing it.

A.J. Lewis, Huntersville

Good riddance, Raleigh buses

I’ve been using Raleigh’s bus system for five years. I wanted to like it, but today is likely my last ride and the reason is this: Utterly Unreliable.

I live in Knightdale and work at NC State. It takes two buses to make that 9-mile trip. I learned quickly that transfers don’t work. Connection times are tight, buses are consistently late, and they run infrequently; missing a connection is easy and time consuming.

Next year my trip will require three buses. This is an intentional part of the transit plan – shorten routes and increase the numbers of transfers without significantly increasing frequency on most routes. I predict failure.

One of the common conversations I’ve overheard on buses includes something like, “I’m getting a car soon and won’t have to put up with this.”

I’m lucky enough to have a vehicle and I’m done putting up with this.

George Hess, Knightdale

Get it right on Chernobyl

Regarding “Chernobyl: The deadly lessons of production and regulation” (June 26):

I take exception to op-ed writer Richard Williams’ statement “that multiple studies have shown that lower levels (of ionizing radiation) are not only safe, but can actually be beneficial to our health.”

This is a half-truth at best.

What Williams describes is hormesis, which is very controversial and accepted by only a few genetic toxicologists and radiation biologists.

Most genetic toxicologists believe low doses might produce little harm, but the data showing that low doses are beneficial are quite limited.

Also, the market-driven economy did not save lives and prevent a more severe meltdown at Three Mile Island. It was the U.S. regulatory system and the American tradition of a free press that forced the power plant’s owners to protect communities and the environment instead of engaging in a cover-up.

Andrew Kligerman, Hillsborough, PhD

Retired genetic toxicologist

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