North Carolina

Coffee shop customers may have been exposed to measles, NC officials say

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People who visited a coffee shop in Durham, North Carolina, on June 10 may have been exposed to measles, health officials warn.

The Durham County Department of Public Health said on Saturday that there was a “possible case” of measles that “may have been infectious” at Bean Traders coffee shop in Durham between 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Monday.

It’s safe to go to the coffee shop now, and people who were there outside of those specific times shouldn’t worry, the department said on Saturday.

There are currently no confirmed cases of measles in the state, the department said.

Dr. Arlene Sena, medical and laboratory director at the Durham County Department of Public Health, told WNCN that the department was told about the possible case on Friday.

“The investigation continued to (Saturday), and we notified Bean Traders as soon as we were aware of that information,” she said.

People who could have been exposed on Monday should be on the lookout for symptoms until July 1, the department said.

Symptoms of measles start with a fever, runny nose, watery or red eyes and a cough. A few days later, a rash starts on the face and spreads to the whole body, according to the department.

If symptoms show, stay home to avoid exposing others. If a rash develops, call a doctor before going to the office or the emergency room, the department said.

People who are not vaccinated, who are immunocompromised or who are pregnant and who could have been exposed on Monday should contact the health department.

The MMR vaccine is safe and effective at preventing measles, and two doses are recommended for almost everyone, the department said.

The first dose should be given to children between the ages of 12 and 15 months, and the second should be given before they start kindergarten, the department said.

Adults can be vaccinated, too.

Sena told WNCN that measles are usually rare but that there has been an outbreak across the country.

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