Tehassi Hill, tribal chairman of the Oneida Nation, stands outside a federal appeals court Wednesday, March 13, 2019 in New Orleans, following arguments on the constitutionality of a law giving Native American families preference in adoption of Native American children. A Texas-based federal judge ruled the 1978 law unconstitutional last year. Hill is among leaders of various Native American tribes hoping the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will reverse the ruling and uphold the law.
Tehassi Hill, tribal chairman of the Oneida Nation, stands outside a federal appeals court Wednesday, March 13, 2019 in New Orleans, following arguments on the constitutionality of a law giving Native American families preference in adoption of Native American children. A Texas-based federal judge ruled the 1978 law unconstitutional last year. Hill is among leaders of various Native American tribes hoping the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will reverse the ruling and uphold the law. Kevin McGill AP Photo
Tehassi Hill, tribal chairman of the Oneida Nation, stands outside a federal appeals court Wednesday, March 13, 2019 in New Orleans, following arguments on the constitutionality of a law giving Native American families preference in adoption of Native American children. A Texas-based federal judge ruled the 1978 law unconstitutional last year. Hill is among leaders of various Native American tribes hoping the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will reverse the ruling and uphold the law. Kevin McGill AP Photo