Elections

Who’s running for Durham mayor and City Council? When, where to vote early and more.

Ten candidates are competing for three at-large seats on the Durham City Council. The field will be reduced to six with the results of the municipal primary election Oct. 8. Early voting runs Sept. 18-Oct. 4.
Ten candidates are competing for three at-large seats on the Durham City Council. The field will be reduced to six with the results of the municipal primary election Oct. 8. Early voting runs Sept. 18-Oct. 4. mshultz@newsobserver.com

Voters in many towns and cities around North Carolina go to the polls on Oct. 8. Here’s what you need to know before you cast your vote in Durham.

Who’s running in Durham

Voters will see candidates for three at-large City Council seats in the municipal primary election. These at-large seats are elected by everyone within the city. The term for the at-large seats are for four years.

Durham City Council at-large candidates (three seats)

Charlitta Burruss

Javiera Caballero (incumbent), www.javieracaballeroparadurham.com

Ricardo Correa, www.ricardocorreafordurham.com

Joshua Gunn, www.JGunnForDurham.com

Jillian Johnson (incumbent), www.jillianfordurham.com

Daniel Meier, www.meierfordurham.com

Victoria Peterson, www.votevictoriapeterson.com

Charlie Reece (incumbent), www.charliefordurham.com

John Tarantino

Jacqueline Wagstaff

The top six finishers will advance to the municipal general election Nov. 5, along with the two candidates for mayor and affordable housing bond. Get details about each candidate at bit.ly/DurhamCandidates2019.

Durham Mayoral candidates

Steve Schewel (incumbent), www.stevefordurham.com

Sylvester Williams, www.facebook.com/groups/103209079781459

Some voters in Durham County will vote for candidates running in Chapel Hill and Morrisville. You can find the Chapel Hill Town Council candidates at bit.ly/ChapelHillCandidates2019 and other Wake County town and city candidates at bit.ly/WakeCountyLocalCandidates. Candidates in all races around North Carolina are listed at ncbse.gov.

$95 million affordable housing bond

Durham city leaders have proposed the bond to help the Durham Housing Authority redevelop several of its downtown properties into mixed-income neighborhoods. The DHA will maintain a minimum of 447 units reserved for residents making less than 30% of the area median income (AMI). The neighborhoods will have additional units for residents making less than 60% of AMI and some market-rate units.

Where and when to vote in Durham

Durham’s municipal primary election is Oct. 8, 2019, and early voting runs Sept. 18-Oct. 4.

The deadline to register to vote for the municipal elections has passed, but voters can update their registration during early voting.

People will not be able to update their registration on Oct. 8. A photo ID is not required to vote in the 2019 elections.

There are four early voting locations for the Durham primary municipal elections

Criminal Justice Resources Center, 326 E Main Street, Durham

South Regional Library, 4505 South Alston Ave., Durham

North Regional Library, 221 Milton Rd., Durham

NCCU Turner Law Building, 640 Nelson St., Durham

You can find your polling place at DurhamCounty.gov. Don’t assume you’ll vote at the same place you voted in the last election; check the Durham County site’s list of recent changes.

Read more about issues in Durham

‘Children are dying.’ Durham councilman says city has a gun emergency

Does Durham need more police? Progressive leaders split on how to fight the violence

Durham leader says city’s affordable housing bond won’t push people from their homes

Read more about the candidates.

Where do Durham City Council candidates stand on the issues? Find some answers here.

Can ‘Bull City Together’ incumbents hold their seats in Durham City Council race?

Bull City Politics: Incumbents who rejected more police officers take heat at forums

People’s Alliance, Durham Committee announce endorsements in Durham. Who got them?

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