Education

Parents warned of possible chickenpox at East Chapel Hill High School

This patient with chickenpox developed lesions on the skin of his chest and torso.
Chickenpox is an infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus resulting in an itchy blister-like rash, tiredness and fever. It appears first on the trunk and face, but can spread over the entire body causing between 250 and 500 itchy blisters.
This patient with chickenpox developed lesions on the skin of his chest and torso. Chickenpox is an infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus resulting in an itchy blister-like rash, tiredness and fever. It appears first on the trunk and face, but can spread over the entire body causing between 250 and 500 itchy blisters. Centers for Disease Control

Parents are urged to be vigilant after a possible case of chickenpox was reported at East Chapel Hill High School this week.

The Orange County Health Department sent parents a letter Wednesday, warning them about their children's possible exposure to the contagious disease.

The student in question also attended East Chapel Hill High's combined musical concert performance Tuesday with Phillips Middle School.

"If your child develops any symptoms of chickenpox, contact your child’s pediatrician or local health department to discuss his care. Please call ahead if you are planning to visit any type of healthcare facility," Quintana Stewart, the Orange County health director wrote parents.

Chickenpox is a contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Symptoms include a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever lasting an average of four to six days. Most children recover without any problems.

The disease is spread through the air from an infected person’s coughing or sneezing or by direct contact with the blisters. A person with chickenpox can spread the disease one to two days before they get the rash until all of their blisters have formed scabs. It takes from 10 to 21 days after exposure to a person with chickenpox for a person to develop chickenpox.

People with questions or concerns are asked to call their medical provider or Iulia Vann, the Orange County public health services manager, at 919-245-2425.

Greg Childress: 919-419-6645, @gchild6645
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