Jeter stars in All-Star Game finale, Trout spurs AL victory

Jul. 15, 2014 @ 11:59 PM

Derek Jeter soaked in the adulation from fans and players during one more night on baseball’s national stage, set the tone for the American League with a pregame speech and delivered two final All-Star hits.

Mike Trout, perhaps the top candidate to succeed the 40-year-old Yankees captain as the face of the game, seemed ready to assume the role with a tiebreaking triple and later a go-ahead double that earned him MVP honors.

On a summer evening filled with reminders of generational change, the AL kept up nearly two decades of dominance by beating the National League 5-3 in the All-Star game Tuesday for its 13th win in 17 years.

Miguel Cabrera homered to help give the AL champion home-field advantage for the World Series.

No matter what else happened, it seemed destined to be another special event for Jeter.

He received a 63-second standing ovation when he walked to the plate leading off the bottom of the first, another rousing cheer when he led off the third and about two minutes of applause after AL manager John Farrell sent Alexei Ramirez to shortstop to replace him at the start of the fourth.

As Frank Sinatra’s recording of “New York, New York” boomed over the Target Field speakers and his parents watched from the stands, Jeter repeatedly waved to the crowd, exchanged handshakes and hugs in the AL dugout and then came back onto the field for a curtain call.

While not as flashy as Mariano Rivera’s All-Star farewell at Citi Field last year, when all the other players left the great reliever alone on the field for an eighth-inning solo bow, Jeter also tried not to make a fuss.

A 14-time All-Star who was MVP of the 2000 game in Atlanta, he announced in February this will be his final season. His hits left him with a .481 All-Star average (13 for 27), just behind Charlie Gehringer’s .500 record (10 for 20) for players with 20 or more at-bats.

While the Yankees are .500 at the break and in danger of missing the postseason in consecutive years for the first time in two decades, Jeter and the Angels’ Trout gave a boost to whichever AL team reaches the World Series.

The AL improved to 9-3 since the All-Star game started deciding which league gets Series home-field advantage; 23 of the last 28 titles were won by teams scheduled to host four of a possible seven games.

Detroit’s Max Scherzer, in line to be the most-prized free agent pitcher after the season, pitched a scoreless fifth for the victory, and Glen Perkins got the save in his home ballpark.

Pat Neshek, a hometown favorite whose brother works on the Target Field grounds crew, took the loss.

The AL won for the first time in three tries in Minnesota; it lost 6-5 at Metropolitan Stadium in 1965 and 6-1 at the normally homer-friendly Metrodome, where not one longball was hit under its Teflon roof in 1985.

Target Field, a $545 million, limestone-encased jewel that opened in 2010, produced an All-Star cycle just eight batters in, with hitters showing off flashy neon-bright spikes and fielders wearing All-Star caps with special designs for the first time.

With the late sunset — the sky didn’t darken until the fifth inning, well after 9 o’clock — there was bright sunshine when Jeter was cheered before his first at-bat. He was introduced by a recording of late Yankees public address announcer Bob Sheppard’s deep monotone: “Now batting for the American League, from the New York Yankees, the shortstop, number two, Derek Jeter. Number two.

St. Louis pitcher Adam Wainwright left his glove on the mound and backed up toward second, clapping along with the crowd of 41,048. When Jeter finally stepped into the batter’s box, he took a ball and lined a 90 mph cutter down the right-field line for a double.

“I was going to give him a couple pipe shots just to — he deserved it,” Wainwright said. “I thought he was going to hit something hard to the right side for a single or an out. I probably should have pitched him a little bit better.”

Jeter appreciated the move, saying “for him to do that meant a lot to me.”

And Wainwright’s unorthodox decision was endorsed by Los Angeles Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw.

“He knew he was going to do the right thing,” Kershaw said. “He’s a class act.”

Trout, the 22-year-old Los Angeles outfielder who finished second to Cabrera in AL MVP voting in each of the last two seasons, followed Jeter in the first by tripling off the right-field wall.

After Robinson Cano struck out, Cabrera lined a sinker over the left-field wall for a 3-0 lead — just the fourth home run in the last six All-Star games.

Jeter then hit a soft single into right off Alfredo Simon leading off the third but was stranded.

The NL, which still holds a 43-40-2 advantage in the series, came back on consecutive RBI doubles by Chase Utley and Jonathan Lucroy off Jon Lester that made it 3-2. Lucroy’s run-scoring double against Chris Sale tied the score in the fourth.

The AL went ahead for good in the fifth against Neshek, the St. Louis reliever who grew up in the Minneapolis suburb of Brooklyn Park and started his career with the Twins.

Josh Donaldson and Derek Norris hit one-out singles, and Trout hit an RBI double down the third-base line that was ruled fair by umpire Scott Barry. Because the ball landed in front of the umpire — it was real close to the line — it was not reviewable under baseball’s new replay rules by Jerry Layne, the umpire monitoring on video at the Replay Operations Center in New York.

Jose Altuve followed with a sacrifice fly off Tyler Clippard that made it 5-3.

NOTES: Next year’s All-Star game is in Cincinnati.

Jeter bids farewell with 2-hit All-Star Game finale as AL wins

BY DAVE CAMPBELL, Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. -- Derek Jeter was a huge hit from the very start in his final All-Star game.

Batting leadoff for the American League, the 40-year-old shortstop for the New York Yankees soaked in an ovation that lasted more than a minute at Target Field, before seizing the moment Tuesday night by hitting a double.

Jeter soon crossed the plate for the game’s first run. After three innings of action, he was ceremonially removed from his familiar position in the field to one more round of revering cheers.

The double was one of Jeter’s classic, opposite-field line drives to right. He singled to right field in his next at-bat, too, raising his All-Star batting average to a robust .481 — 13 hits in 27 at-bats. That’s the second-best of all time for players with 20 or more at-bats, behind Charlie Gehringer.

OK, so maybe NL starter Adam Wainwright admitted he threw something juicy for Jeter to hit.

“I was going to give him a couple pipe shots,” the right-hander said. “He deserved it.”

Jeter showed off in the field, too. In the top of the first, he made a slick, diving stop on Andrew McCutchen’s sharp groundball up the middle. Jeter got to his feet and fired an on-target throw to first base, but the fleet-footed McCutchen was too fast, beating it out for a leadoff single.

McCutchen smiled and pointed at Jeter, who grinned back at the reigning NL MVP.

This was the 14th time Jeter was picked as an All-Star. He’s set to retire after this season. When Jeter stepped to the plate, the crowd gave him a 63-second ovation, prompting him to wave, nod and tip his helmet several times.

Wainwright, who spoke the day before about how proud he would be to pitch to Jeter on this memorable occasion, backed up toward second base and left his glove on the mound so he could clap along with everyone else at the ballpark.

With a wide smile, Jeter shouted a few words toward the St. Louis ace, good-naturedly encouraging him to get the inning going.

“Just saying, ‘Dude, I’m not going anywhere until this ovation is starting to die down,’” Wainwright said. “So he was telling me to go, and I just thought he deserved it.”

Fittingly, a recording of late Yankees public address announcer Bob Sheppard’s famous monotone introduction was played as he walked up for his at-bat with thousands of smartphones snapping away in the seats: “Now batting, for the American League, from the New York Yankees, the shortstop, No. 2, Derek Jeter, No. 2.”

The tribute came right after a national television audience tuned to Fox saw a Nike commercial that featured the likes of Michael Jordan, Jay-Z and Rudolph Giuliani paying their respects to the captain. Right after that, he hit his double on the second pitch from Wainwright, drawing cheers from his mom and dad in the stands.

“I didn’t know he was going to hit a double, or I would have changed my mind on that,” Wainwright said. “I thought he was going to hit something hard to the right side for a single or an out. I probably should have pitched him a little bit better.”

In the third, Jeter took Cincinnati ace Alfredo Simon to a full count before his single.

Then, right before the fourth inning began, Jeter was taken out for Alexei Ramirez and the captain jogged off. With Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” playing on the stadium speakers, he waved to the crowd and exchanged hugs and handshakes in the AL dugout and then took a curtain call before the game resumed.

Earlier in the day, Jeter was the first player to ride down the red carpet that was rolled out for downtown parade of the game’s greats, from their hotel to the ballpark about 10 blocks away. The hearty ovations started there, while Jeter rode with his parents and other family members, who came to Minneapolis for the event.

“I think everyone WANTS it to sink in that this is my last,” Jeter said in the clubhouse before batting practice, “but I’m just trying to enjoy it while I’m here and stop thinking about this is the last one.”

Commissioner Bud Selig said Major League Baseball has been discussing ways to formally honor Jeter as he enters the final few months of his career.

“If you were sitting two decades ago and you said, ‘Boy, this is a guy I want to be the face of baseball and be what this generation will remember,’ you couldn’t have written a script like this,” Selig said. “He is just remarkable.”

2014 All-Star Game Play-by-Play
The Associated Press


Tuesday
At Target Field
Minneapolis

Lineups_National: CF Andrew McCutchen, RF Yasiel Puig, SS Troy Tulowitzki, 1B Paul Goldschmidt, DH Giancarlo Stanton, 3B Aramis Ramirez; 2B Chase Utley, C Jonathan Lucroy, LF Carlos Gomez. P Adam Wainwright

American: SS Derek Jeter, LF Mike Trout, 2B Robinson Cano, 1B Miguel Cabrera, RF Jose Bautista, DH Nelson Cruz, CF Adam Jones, 3B Josh Donaldson, C Salvador Perez. P Felix Hernandez.

Umpires_Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Scott Barry; Left, Todd Tichenor; Right, Vic Carapazza; Replay Official, Jerry Layne.

Official Scorers— Scott Thornley, Gregg Wong, La Velle Neal.

First Pitch_8:18 p.m. EDT.

National First: Hernandez pitching. McCutchen infield single to short. On a Hernandez’ wild pitch, McCutchen advanced to second. Puig struck out swinging. Tulowitzki struck out swinging, McCutchen steals third. Goldschmidt grounded out third baseman Donaldson to first baseman Cabrera.

0 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. National 0, American 0.

American First: Wainwright pitching. Jeter doubled down the right-field line. Trout tripled to right, Jeter scored. Cano struck out swinging. Cabrera, on a 0-1 pitch, homered to left, Trout scored. Bautista struck out swinging. Cruz grounded out to shortstop Tulowitzki to first baseman Goldschmidt.

3 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 3, National 0.

National Second: Jon Lester pitching. Stanton popped out to second baseman Cano. Ar.Ramirez singled to center. Utley doubled to center, Ar.Ramirez scored. Lucroy doubled to left, Utley scored. Gomez popped out to catcher Perez in fouled territory. McCutchen popped out to centerfielder Jones.

2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 3, National 2.

American Second: Clayton Kershaw pitching. Jones popped out to third baseman Ar.Ramirez in foul territory. Donaldson struck out swinging. Perez grounded out to third baseman Ar.Ramirez to first baseman Goldschmidt.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 3, National 2.

National Third: Yu Darvish pitching. Puig struck out looking. Tulowitzki lined out to leftfielder Trout. Goldschmidt lined out to second baseman Cano.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 3, National 2.

American Third: Alfredo Simon pitching. Jeter singled to right. On a wild pitch by Simon, Jeter to second. Trout flied out to leftfielder Gomez. Cano struck out swinging. Cabrera lined out to shortstop Tulowitzki.

0 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 3, National 2.

National Fourth: Chris Sale pitching. Alexei Ramirez replaces Jeter at shortstop. Stanton flied out to centerfielder Jones. Ar.Ramirez lined out to third baseman Donaldson. Utley hit-by-pitch. Dee Gordon, pinch ran for Utley. Lucroy doubled to right, Gordon scored. Gomez struck out swinging.

1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 3, National 3.

American Fourth: Zack Greinke pitching, Gordon playing second, and Devin Mesoraco catching. Bautista grounded out to third baseman Ar.Ramirez to first baseman Goldschmmidt. Cruz struck out swinging. Jones struck out swinging.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 3, National 3.

National Fifth: Max Scherzer pitching, Jose Altuve playing second base and Derek Norris catching. McCutchen grounded out to third baseman Donaldson to first baseman Cabrera. Puig struck out swinging. Tulowitzki doubled to right. Goldschmidt struck out swinging.

0 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 3, National 3.

American Fifth: Pat Neshek pitching. Grounded out to first baseman Donaldson to pitcher Neshek. Norris singled to left. Al.Ramirez singled to left, Norris to second. Trout doubled down the left field line, Norris scored and Al.Ramirez to third. Tyler Clippard pitching. Altuve sacrifice fly out to leftfielder Gomez, Al.Ramirez scored. Cabrera flied out to centerfielder McCutchen.

2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 5, National 3.

National Sixth: Yoenis Cespedes playing leftfield, Jose Abreu first base, Brandon Moss rightfield, Michael Brantley centerfield, Adrian Beltre third base and Scott Kazmir pitching. Stanton struck out swinging. Ar.Ramirez doubled down the left field line. Gordon grounded out to second baseman Altuve to first baseman Abreu, Ar.Ramirez to third. Koji Uehara pitching. Mesoraco struck out swinging.

0 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 5, National 3.

American Sixth: Charlie Blackmon playing center field, Hunter Pence right field, Starlin Castro shortstop, Freddie Freeman first base, Josh Harrison left field, Francisco Rodriguez pitching and Todd Frazier third base. Cespedes grounded out to third baseman Frazier to first baseman Freeman. Kyle Seager, pinch hitting for Cruz, grounded out to first baseman Freeman. Beltre walked. Brantley grounded out to second baseman Gordon to first baseman Freeman.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. American 5, National 3.

National Seventh: Greg Holland pitching. Harrison flied out to rightfielder Moss. Blackmon struck out swinging. Pence grounded out to third baseman Beltre to first baseman Abreu.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 5, National 3.

American Seventh: Daniel Murphy playing second base and Craig Kimbrel pitching. Norris struck out swinging. Al.Ramirez reached first on error by first baseman Freeman. With Moss batting, Al.Ramirez stole second. Moss struck out swinging. Ian Kinsler pinch hitting, struck out swinging.

0 runs, 0 hits, 1 error, 1 left on. American 5, National 3.

National Eighth: Kinsler playing second base, Erick Aybar shortstop and Sean Doolittle pitching. Castro struck out swinging. Freeman singled to right. Anthony Rizzo pinch hitting, struck out swinging. Fernando Rodney pitching. Frazier walked, Freeman to second. Murphy struck out swinging.

0 runs, 1 hit, 0 errors, 2 left on. American 5, National 3.

American Eighth: Tony Watson pitching. Abreu flied out to leftfielder Harrison. Aroldis Chapman pitching. Cespedes grounded out to shortstop Castro to first baseman Freeman. Seager grounded out to first baseman Freeman to pitcher Chapman.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 error, 0 left on. American 5, National 3.

National Ninth: Kurt Suzuki catching and Glen Perkins pitching. Miguel Montero pinch hitting, flied out to centerfielder Brantley. Harrison struck out swinging. Blackmon grounded out to secon baseman Kinsler to first baseman Abreu.

0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. American 5, National 3.

 

AL All-Stars 5, NL All-Stars 3

NL AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.McCutchen cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333
Blackmon cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Puig rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000
Pence rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Tulowitzki ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333
S.Castro ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Goldschmidt 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
F.Freeman 1b 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
Stanton dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
c-Rizzo ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .667
Frazier 3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 ---
Utley 2b 1 1 1 1 0 0 1.000
1-D.Gordon pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 0 .000
Dan.Murphy 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Lucroy c 2 0 2 2 0 0 1.000
Mesoraco c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
M.Montero c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
C.Gomez lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
J.Harrison lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Totals 35 3 8 3 1 13
AL AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Jeter ss 2 1 2 0 0 0 1.000
Al.Ramirez ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500
Aybar ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Trout lf 3 1 2 2 0 0 .667
Moss rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Cano 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
Altuve 2b 0 0 0 1 0 0 ---
b-Kinsler ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Mi.Cabrera 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .333
J.Abreu 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Bautista rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Cespedes lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
N.Cruz dh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
a-Seager ph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
A.Jones cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
A.Beltre 3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 ---
Donaldson 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Brantley cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
S.Perez c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
D.Norris c 2 1 1 0 0 1 .500
K.Suzuki c 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 31 5 7 5 1 9
NL 020 100 000—3 8 1
AL 300 020 00x—5 7 0

b-struck out for Altuve in the 7th.

1-ran for Utley in the 4th.

E_F.Freeman. LOB_NL 7, AL 4. 2B_Tulowitzki, Ar.Ramirez, Utley, Lucroy 2, Jeter, Trout. 3B_Trout. HR_Mi.Cabrera, off Wainwright. RBIs_Utley, Lucroy 2, Trout 2, Altuve, Mi.Cabrera 2. SB_A.McCutchen, Al.Ramirez. SF_Altuve.

Runners left in scoring position_NL 6 (Goldschmidt 2, A.McCutchen, C.Gomez, Mesoraco, Dan.Murphy); AL 3 (Mi.Cabrera 2, Kinsler). RISP_NL 1 for 11; AL 3 for 10.

Runners moved up_D.Gordon.

NL IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Wainwright 1 3 3 3 0 2 21 27.00
Kershaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00
Simon 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 0.00
Greinke 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00
Neshek L 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 15 54.00
Clippard 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00
Fr.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 0.00
Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 3 19 0.00
Watson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
A.Chapman 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00
AL IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
F.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 0.00
Lester 1 3 2 2 0 0 22 18.00
Darvish 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00
Sale 1 1 1 1 0 1 16 9.00
Scherzer W 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 0.00
Kazmir H 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00
Uehara H 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.00
G.Holland H 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00
Doolittle H 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 13 0.00
Rodney H 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 8 0.00
Perkins S 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00

Inherited runners-scored_Clippard 2-1, Uehara 1-0, Rodney 1-0. HBP_by Sale (Utley). WP_Simon, F.Hernandez.

Umpires_Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, Scott Barry; Right, Vic Carapazza; Left, Todd Tichenor.

T_3:13. A_41,048 (39,021).



All-Time All-Star Game Results

2014 — American, 5-3

2013 — American, 3-0

2012 — National, 8-0

2011 — National, 5-1

2010 — National, 3-1

2009 — American, 4-3

2008 — American, 4-3, 15 innings

2007 — American, 5-4

2006 — American, 3-2

2005 — American, 7-5

2004 — American, 9-4

2003 — American, 7-6

2002 — Tied 7-7, 11 innings

2001 — American, 4-1

2000 — American, 6-3

1999 — American, 4-1

1998 — American, 13-8

1997 — American, 3-1

1996 — National, 6-0

1995 — National, 3-2

1994 — National, 8-7, 10 innings

1993 — American, 9-3

1992 — American, 13-6

1991 — American, 4-2

1990 — American, 2-0

1989 — American, 5-3

1988 — American, 2-1

1987 — National, 2-0, 13 innings

1986 — American, 3-2

1985 — National, 6-1

1984 — National, 3-1

1983 — American, 13-3

1982 — National, 4-1

1981 — National, 5-4

1980 — National, 4-2

1979 — National, 7-6

1978 — National, 7-3

1977 — National, 7-5

1976 — National, 7-1

1975 — National, 6-3

1974 — National, 7-2

1973 — National, 7-1

1972 — National, 4-3, 10 innings

1971 — American, 6-4

1970 — National, 5-4, 12 innings

1969 — National, 9-3

1968 — National, 1-0

1967 — National, 2-1, 15 innings

1966 — National, 2-1, 10 innings

1965 — National, 6-5

1964 — National, 7-4

1963 — National, 5-3

1962 — National, 3-1

1962 — American, 9-4

1961 — Tied 1-1, 9 innings, rain

1961 — National, 5-4, 10 innings

1960 — National, 5-3

1960 — National, 6-0

1959 — National, 5-4

1959 — American, 5-3

1958 — American, 4-3

1957 — American, 6-5

1956 — National, 7-3

1955 — National, 6-5, 12 innings

1954 — American, 11-9

1953 — National, 5-1

1952 — National, 3-2, 5 innings, rain

1951 — National, 8-3

1950 — National, 4-3, 14 innings

1949 — American, 11-7

1948 — American, 5-2

1947 — American, 2-1

1946 — American, 12-0

1945 — No Game

1944 — National, 7-1

1943 — American, 5-3

1942 — American, 3-1

1941 — American, 7-5

1940 — National, 4-0

1939 — American, 3-1

1938 — National, 4-1

1937 — American, 8-3

1936 — National, 4-3

1935 — American, 4-1

1934 — American, 9-7

1933 — American, 4-2

 

All-Time All-Star Game MVPs

2014 — Mike Trout, Los Angeles, AL

2013 — Mariano Rivera, New York, AL

2012 — Melky Cabrera, San Francisco, NL

2011 — Prince Fielder, Milwaukee, NL

2010 — Brian McCann, Atlanta, NL

2009 — Carl Crawford, Tampa Bay, AL

2008 — J.D. Drew, Boston, AL

2007 — Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle, AL

2006 — Michael Young, Texas, AL

2005 — Miguel Tejada, Baltimore, AL

2004 — Alfonso Soriano, Texas, AL

2003 — Garret Anderson, Anaheim, AL

2002 — None

2001 — Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore, AL

2000 — Derek Jeter, New York, AL

1999 — Pedro Martinez, Boston, AL

1998 — Roberto Alomar, Baltimore, AL

1997 — Sandy Alomar Jr., Cleveland, AL

1996 — Mike Piazza, Los Angeles, NL

1995 — Jeff Conine, Florida, NL

1994 — Fred McGriff, Atlanta, NL

1993 — Kirby Puckett, Minnesota, AL

1992 — Ken Griffey Jr., Seattle, AL

1991 — Cal Ripken Jr., Baltimore, AL

1990 — Julio Franco, Texas, AL

1989 — Bo Jackson, Kansas City, AL

1988 — Terry Steinbach, Oakland, AL

1987 — Tim Raines, Montreal, NL

1986 — Roger Clemens, Boston, AL

1985 — LaMarr Hoyt, San Diego, NL

1984 — Gary Carter, Montreal, NL

1983 — Fred Lynn, California, AL

1982 — Dave Concepcion, Cincinnati, NL

1981 — Gary Carter, Montreal, NL

1980 — Ken Griffey Sr., Cincinnati, NL

1979 — Dave Parker, Pittsburgh, NL

1978 — Steve Garvey, Los Angeles, NL

1977 — Don Sutton, Los Angeles, NL

1976 — George Foster, Cincinnati, NL

1975 — Bill Madlock, Chicago, NL, and Jon Matlack, New York, NL

1974 — Steve Garvey, Los Angeles, NL

1973 — Bobby Bonds, San Francisco, NL

1972 — Joe Morgan, Cincinnati, NL

1971 — Frank Robinson, Baltimore, AL

1970 — Carl Yastrzemski, Boston, AL

1969 — Willie McCovey, San Francisco, NL

1968 — Willie Mays, San Francisco, NL

1967 — Tony Perez, Cincinnati, NL

1966 — Brooks Robinson, Baltimore, AL

1965 — Juan Marichal, San Francisco, NL

1964 — John Callison, Philadelphia, NL

1963 — Willie Mays, San Francisco, NL

1962 — x-Maury Wills, Los Angeles, NL

1962 — x-Leon Wagner, Los Angeles, AL

x-two games