Opinion: Columnists

Jul. 12, 2014 @ 07:40 AM

‘Stupid hats’ or thinking caps?

Gov. Pat McCrory’s admonition for people not to put on their “stupid hat” during Hurricane Arthur was easily understood, timely and right on target. It started us thinking where else we might be wearing “stupid hats.”


Jul. 11, 2014 @ 11:00 AM

Louis Zamperini was more than a hero

Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below.

 

Jul. 08, 2014 @ 08:11 AM

Preserving the monuments of a controversial past

“You see him and ask: ‘Why is the statue still here? What was it he actually stood for?’ This is the kind of debate that a public work of art makes possible. We won't change the way people think just by getting rid of a monument.”


Jul. 07, 2014 @ 08:55 AM

Courageous or spineless? Our actions -- or inactions -- decide for us

The psychological explanation for what happened to Catherine Ferreira is neat and tidy and sounds like reason.

"The bystander effect," explains Psychology Today on its website, "occurs when the presence of others hinders an individual from intervening in an emergency situation." 


Jul. 04, 2014 @ 02:28 PM

A 'narrow' decision from the narrow-minded

Relax. This is not a slippery slope.

So Justices Samuel Alito writing for the majority and Anthony Kennedy writing in concurrence, take pains to assure us in the wake of the Supreme Court's latest disastrous decision. 


Jul. 02, 2014 @ 02:00 PM

Curse of judicial minimalism

Even when Supreme Court decisions are unanimous, the justices can be fiercely divided about fundamental matters, as was demonstrated by two 9-0 rulings last week.


Jul. 01, 2014 @ 08:31 AM

A great generation and a great book title

“It turned out to be a hell-of-a book title.”

Tom Brokaw, former NBC News anchor and productive author, was talking, with his usual modesty, about “The Greatest Generation.”


Jun. 30, 2014 @ 11:21 AM

Half way is still only half way

Sen. Richard Russell called it a work of "manifold evils."

Sen. Barry Goldwater called it a "threat to the very essence" of America.

Rep. Howard Smith called it a "monstrous instrument of oppression."

It was the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 


Jun. 28, 2014 @ 08:24 PM

When ‘tolerance’ declares some beliefs intolerable

Amanda Blackhorse, a Navajo who successfully moved a federal agency to withdraw trademark protections from the Washington Redskins because it considers the team's name derogatory, lives on a reservation where Navajos root for the Red Mesa High School Redskins. She opposes this name; the Native Americans who picked and retain it evidently do not.


Jun. 28, 2014 @ 05:21 PM

Education, availability help break bad food habits

When this paper commented editorially on the county’s recognition by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Culture of Health Prize, we also noted the continued challenges we as a community face for better health outcomes.


Jun. 28, 2014 @ 10:08 AM

The 2014 legislative Summer Olympic games

State  Sen. Jerry Tillman says getting accurate Medicaid budget numbers is like trying to nail Jell-O to a tree. His statement, both accurate and amusing, doesn’t reflect last week’s entertainment in Raleigh.  


Jun. 27, 2014 @ 10:31 AM

Tragedy explored in 'Broken Heart Land'

His family doesn't know if Zack actually heard any of it firsthand.

 

Jun. 25, 2014 @ 12:53 PM

Mississippi votes its appetite

Chris McDaniel, 41, the flawed paladin of the tea party persuasion who in Mississippi's Republican Senate primary failed to wrest the nomination from the faltering hands of six-term incumbent Thad Cochran, 76, came into politics after a stint in talk radio.


Jun. 24, 2014 @ 08:41 AM

“Saving Texas” and forgetting about Scotland

How does Harry Potter feel about the hotly contested proposal to separate Scotland from the United Kingdom?


Jun. 23, 2014 @ 02:36 PM

Pitts: Beware the unimaginable

This is what jumps out at you in perusing postmortems of the two greatest surprise attacks in American history. In the days and weeks leading up to Dec. 7, 1941, and Sept. 11, 2001, there were numerous clues that seem neon in hindsight, but which no one pursued.