In this Oct, 25, 2016 file photo, former President Bill Clinton, second from left, greets former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt, second from right, U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-1st District, right, and then-North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper during a rally, while campaigning for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. The four-term Democratic governor is among the state's most influential politicians of the 20th century, but remains engaged in 21st century policy and politics as he turned 80 years old in May. (Alan Campbell/The Rocky Mount Telegram via AP, File)
In this Oct, 25, 2016 file photo, former President Bill Clinton, second from left, greets former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt, second from right, U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-1st District, right, and then-North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper during a rally, while campaigning for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. The four-term Democratic governor is among the state's most influential politicians of the 20th century, but remains engaged in 21st century policy and politics as he turned 80 years old in May. (Alan Campbell/The Rocky Mount Telegram via AP, File) Alan Campbell AP
In this Oct, 25, 2016 file photo, former President Bill Clinton, second from left, greets former North Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt, second from right, U.S. Rep. G.K. Butterfield, D-1st District, right, and then-North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper during a rally, while campaigning for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. The four-term Democratic governor is among the state's most influential politicians of the 20th century, but remains engaged in 21st century policy and politics as he turned 80 years old in May. (Alan Campbell/The Rocky Mount Telegram via AP, File) Alan Campbell AP

At 80, Gov. Hunt still pitching for education, North Carolina

May 27, 2017 4:07 PM

More Videos

  • ‘You can call them slaves if you want to... I would call them workers,’ Alamance commissioner says

    Alamance commissioner Tim Sutton referred to slaves as workers during a meeting of the commission. Sutton was referring to his great-grandfather's service in the Confederate army during the Civil War and said “It is my understanding that when he died ... that some guys on the farm, you can call them slaves if you want to, but I would just call them workers, that they raised a good bit of my family. When the time came, my great-grandmother gave them land.'