Shoukhrat Mitalipov, left, talks with research assistant Hayley Darby in the Mitalipov Lab at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore. Mitalipov led a research team that, for the first time, used gene editing to repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, laboratory experiments that might one day help prevent inherited diseases from being passed to future generations.
Shoukhrat Mitalipov, left, talks with research assistant Hayley Darby in the Mitalipov Lab at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore. Mitalipov led a research team that, for the first time, used gene editing to repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, laboratory experiments that might one day help prevent inherited diseases from being passed to future generations. Kristyna Wentz-Graff Oregon Health & Science University
Shoukhrat Mitalipov, left, talks with research assistant Hayley Darby in the Mitalipov Lab at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore. Mitalipov led a research team that, for the first time, used gene editing to repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, laboratory experiments that might one day help prevent inherited diseases from being passed to future generations. Kristyna Wentz-Graff Oregon Health & Science University

University reports first safe repair of disease-causing gene in human embryos

August 07, 2017 06:30 AM

UPDATED August 07, 2017 06:30 AM

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