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  • Durham students share passion for arts, P.E. with N.C. Sen. Mike Woodard

    Little River School Elementary School students shared their excitement for extracurriculars, including North Carolina “Ugly Jugs,” with N.C. Sen. Mike Woodard during a recent classroom visit. The Durham Public Schools would either have to lay off 100 arts, music and P.E. teachers or find $6 million dollars to hire additional teachers to reduce class sizes if a state mandate is allowed to stand.

Little River School Elementary School students shared their excitement for extracurriculars, including North Carolina “Ugly Jugs,” with N.C. Sen. Mike Woodard during a recent classroom visit. The Durham Public Schools would either have to lay off 100 arts, music and P.E. teachers or find $6 million dollars to hire additional teachers to reduce class sizes if a state mandate is allowed to stand. Greg Childress gchildress@heraldsun.com
Little River School Elementary School students shared their excitement for extracurriculars, including North Carolina “Ugly Jugs,” with N.C. Sen. Mike Woodard during a recent classroom visit. The Durham Public Schools would either have to lay off 100 arts, music and P.E. teachers or find $6 million dollars to hire additional teachers to reduce class sizes if a state mandate is allowed to stand. Greg Childress gchildress@heraldsun.com

Little River School students express passion about the arts, P.E.

April 06, 2017 3:42 PM

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  • Protesters silently crash UNC University Day ceremony

    Several dozen protesters held small signs demanding the removal of the Confederate 'Silent Sam' statue from the UNC campus as the university held its annual University Day ceremony in Chapel Hill on Oct. 12, 2017. Governor Roy Cooper and UNC Chancellor Carol Folt acknowledged the protesters during their speeches.