Lifestyles: Books

Jan. 11, 2014 @ 09:29 AM

Novelist Cash takes home first Crook’s Corner prize

Wiley Cash was working at Pomegranate Books in Wilmington in support of Small Business Saturday when he got a call that he was on the long list for the first Crook’s Corner Book Prize. “It was a real surprise for me to be on the long list,” he said during his acceptance speech for the prize earlier this week at the restaurant.


Jan. 18, 2014 @ 04:38 PM

Webb to read from new gothic novel

Wendy Webb, who writes gothic mysteries set in old houses, has recently published the newest in her series, titled “The Vanishing” (Hyperion, $17, paperback). It opens with a séance in 1875 that goes awry, then switches to the present day, narrated by Julia Bishop. After her husband’s death (and the fallout from his investment swindle), Bishop gets a visit from the son of Amaris Sinclair, who asks Bishop to live with his mother.


Dec. 28, 2013 @ 04:19 PM

Pitts, Galvez highlight library’s Humanities Programs

Columnist Leonard Pitts will read from his novel “Freeman” March 1. Pitts, photographer Jose Galvez and author Mur Lafferty are among the guests who will speak and give presentations during the winter-spring Humanities Programs series at the Durham County Library. All programs are free and open to the public.

 

Aug. 08, 2014 @ 03:21 PM

A visit to the ‘envisionist’

Gregory Sherl’s debut novel “The Future for Curious People” (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, $14.95), combines speculative fiction with two love stories. The love stories center on Evelyn and Adrian, who at the beginning of the novel are breaking up, and Godfrey and Madge, who are discussing marriage.

 

Aug. 08, 2014 @ 10:27 AM

REVIEW: A novel about opening up

A novel under a new name but by a familiar author, “The Art of Arranging Flowers” is a gentle, comforting read about small-town life and opening up. The author is Lynne Branard, which is the married name of author Lynne Hinton, whose novels include “Pie Town” and “Friendship Cake.”

A little different than her previous novels, “The Art of Arranging Flowers” is set in the Pacific Northwest fictional town of Creekside -- a place where there’s routine even in the abrupt life events. A florist knows there will be weddings, funerals, births and celebrations all year, and Ruby is at the center of it all.


Aug. 02, 2014 @ 08:33 PM

REVIEW: Nixon, on the record

In a taped June 22, 1972, conversation with Bob Haldeman, his chief of staff, President Nixon compared the Watergate break-in to “a comic opera, really.” Nixon and Haldeman were discussing the rumors that were starting to surface around the bizarre burglary attempt at Democratic headquarters in Washington. The operation, Haldeman said, was “so badly done, that nobody believes we could have done it.”


Jul. 19, 2014 @ 12:19 PM

Bookwatch: Cheerleading for state’s biodiversity

Tom Earnhardt talks about “Crossroads of the Natural World: Exploring North Carolina with Tom Earnhardt” on North Carolina Bookwatch today at noon and Thursday at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV.


Jul. 19, 2014 @ 10:52 AM

REVIEW: A Marine’s mission in ‘Sand and Fire’

The setting: Northern Africa, present day. The enemy: a new terrorist group using chemical weapons on civilians. The U.S. Marine: Gunnery Sgt. A.E. Blount. The result: a realistic, engaging, action-filled novel that is “Sand and Fire” by Tom Young.


Jul. 19, 2014 @ 10:13 AM

Books Roundup: Reminiscing about 1970

Lee Zacharias writes with a bittersweet nostalgia about the year 1970 in “The End of Counterculture,” one of the 12 essays in her new collection titled “The Only Sounds We Make” (Hub City Press, $16.95). 


Jul. 16, 2014 @ 06:49 PM

Boy in drug trial out of hospital

Josh Hardy, a 7-year old battling cancer for most of his life, has been discharged from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital after going on an experimental drug from Chimerix in March, according to his mother, Aimee Hardy’s, Facebook page


Jul. 11, 2014 @ 10:17 PM

REVIEW: Fantastic debut of New Orleans author

When someone asks you for a great book to read, usually you pause and think about genre and authors and then give a few options. But every now and then, there’s a book you tell everyone to read, because it is that good. “Dollbaby” by Laura Lane McNeal is that book. You haven’t heard of her before because this is her debut novel. What a way to start.


Jul. 11, 2014 @ 09:54 PM

New edition for Papa fans

In my experience, readers either love or hate Ernest Hemingway’s writing. I am among the former, but even Hemingway disciples have disagreements over which novels and short stories are the greatest, or the worst.


Jul. 05, 2014 @ 11:03 AM

Lewis book chosen for Durham Reads

Civil rights advocate and Congressman John Lewis’ graphic novel “March: Book One,” has been chosen the Durham Reads selection for 2014. Lewis, along with co-author Andrew Aydin and illustrator Nate Powell, will begin the monthlong series of events with a talk Oct. 4 from 2:30 to 5 p.m. at B.N. Duke Auditorium at N.C. Central University.


Jun. 30, 2014 @ 09:02 AM

REVIEW: Beach bag books: Mary Alice Monroe’s summer sisters series

It’s beach read season, and Mary Alice Monroe of South Carolina’s Lowcountry is back this summer with the second in a trilogy of novels about three sisters spending the summer at their grandmother’s home on Sullivan’s Island. Just published, “The Summer Wind” follows last summer’s “The Summer Girls.”


Jun. 27, 2014 @ 03:32 PM

REVIEW: The frustrations and joys of starting late

Anyone who has devoted time to learning an instrument in youth and rediscovered it years or decades later will want to read “The Late Starters Orchestra,” Ari L. Goldman’s memoir of rediscovering the cello as he approached his 60th birthday. I am drawn to Goldman’s story for personal reasons: I once seriously studied the cello, but put it down, only to play it on occasions in fits and starts.