The Chapel Hill Herald: Editorial View All »

Apr. 17, 2014 @ 01:15 AM

Falling unemployment hurts some

A falling unemployment rate might produce bad news for North Carolina residents who still can't find work.

Changes in state law link benefits to the jobless rate. As it drops, payments run out sooner.



The Chapel Hill Herald: Letters View All »

Apr. 16, 2014 @ 11:56 PM

Letters to the Editor CHH, April 20

  • Two promising new leaders 
  • Jacobs can do the job


Columnist: Susan Gladin View All »

Apr. 17, 2014 @ 01:01 AM

We spend too little time at play in our busy lives

My last column here dealt with issues of time and busyness.  I received so many heartfelt emails from readers that I want to revisit that subject and delve a little deeper than the first 675 words allowed me to do.  This isn’t a subject I have mastered, but one I struggle with almost daily.  Apparently I am not alone.



Columnist: Stanley Peele View All »

Apr. 12, 2014 @ 01:27 AM

Hiring N.Y. lawyer not answer to UNC troubles

To quote Will Rogers, “All I know is what I read in the newspapers.” According to the Daily Tar Heel, UNC Chapel Hill is hiring a New York attorney, Kenneth Wainstein, to investigate the football and basketball brouhaha. He is a prominent attorney with excellent credentials. The newspaper reports that he is being hired at $990 an hour and they have no agreement as to how long he takes.



Columnist: Vicki Wentz View All »

Apr. 19, 2014 @ 11:02 AM

Happy Easter, happy spring, have you heard Shania sing!

It’s Easter, and my love to you all! (No, I’m not in the bourbon, I’m on spring break … FINALLY!) In honor of this wondrous holiday, I began the following poem:

 


Columnist: Susie Wilde View All »

Apr. 19, 2014 @ 11:51 AM

'The Execution of Noa P. Singleton,' 'The Never List' two worthwhile listens

I had a seven-hour solo drive to Atlanta, but I was equipped. Or so I thought.
I was halfway through John Banville’s “Ancient Light” (Random House, 8CDs, 9.5 hours). Banville, a Man Booker award-winner, uses elegant language which came alive with Robin Sach’s skillful reading, and I easily entered the troubled mind of Alexander Cleave. Banville’s reflective novel brilliantly weaves Cleave’s risque affair at 15 with his best friend’s mother, feelings of failure after his daughter’s death, and his introspective thoughts about aging. Sach’s narration meshed all time periods without losing flow and, made the protagonist believable and worthy of compassion.